007,

James Bond themes you probably haven't heard before

Thursday, June 18, 2015 Craig Grobler 1 Comments

James Bond Themes You Have Not Heard
James Bond Themes You Have Not Heard


So a little while back a friend and I were discussing the music of James Bond over a Jameson at The Ham Yard Hotel. The week prior in anticipation of Bond 24's SPECTRE expected confirmed production kick-off I had dragged him along to see the West End musical Made in Dagenham with music by David Arnold and starring amongst others Ms Gemma Arterton. With the involvement of Bond alumni, the conversation naturally veered towards the music of Bond.

Firstly regarding Made in Dagenham I liked the bold brassy Britishness of it, the clever set design, my associate liked Mark Hadfield's incredibly hilarious and surreal turn as Harold Wilson and we both loved the dips into Monty Pythonesque political satire & the surprising powerfulness of Gemma Arterton's voice.

We are both from the Roger Moore Bond era and agree on most of the themes and music, but whilst my associate leans towards the Roger Moore female vocal era like; Carly Simon (Nobody Does It Better), Shirley Bassey (Moonraker), Sheena Easton (For Your Eyes Only), Rita Coolidge (All Time High) - whilst I have a strong leaning to the classic Bond sound where it felt they were forging the legend, Shirley Bassey, as well as the incidental music of James Bond.

That is the music in the less exposed moments of the films where the musicians can explore, experiment and bring their personal visions of the film to life - particularly David Arnold's work and Eric Serra's work on GoldenEye. Whilst researching this post I have to say I fell in love with the Roger Moore female vocal era all over again.

The conversation strayed into the grey area of the what-ifs? An area populated by the likes of Mark Ronson, Amy Winehouse, a returning Adele, Noel Gallagher, MobyKaren O, MuseBjork, Natacha Atlas, etc. as well as pretty much everyone on Shaken and Stirred: The David Arnold James Bond Project in collaboration with @DavidGArnold. And this got me thinking about unused James Bond Themes.

Not to stray too far but David Arnold and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra will be bringing A Night at the Movies: David Arnold Live in Concert to London, specifically the Barbican tonight Thursday 18 June 2015. And will be playing a selection from his scores including music from; James Bond: Casino Royale, The World Is Not Enough, Tomorrow Never Dies, Die Another Day, Quantum of Solace, Sherlock, Made in Dagenham, Independence Day, Godzilla, Stargate, Last of the Dogmen, Paul, Music from the London 2012 Olympics and more. For more info on David Arnold's tour dates follow David Arnold on Twitter: @DavidGArnold

The Establishing Shot: OBERHAUSER'S HELICOPTER FROM SPECTRE TAKING OFF WITH BOND'S SPECTRE BOATS IN THE BACKGROUND G-LCPL AEROSPATIALE SA365N2 DAUPHIN 2 - LONDON

With the SPECTRE theme announcement imminent and sadly the Bond SPECTRE boats finally leaving their mooring at the Imperial Wharf Marina this week, presumably signalling the end of the Bond Westminster part of filming. I thought I would highlight some of the lesser-known alternative, demo or rejected James Bond theme songs that quite possibly many may have never heard of - but are occasionally discussed amongst Bond aficionados.

The list is ordered chronologically, starting with:

001.
1962 Monty Norman & Count Basie's James Bond Theme Dr. No's Fantasy (The very first James Bond Theme that we know of)


In 1961 Cubby Broccoli financed Belle or The Ballad of Doctor Crippen, a musical composed by Monty Norman. Whilst the play flopped a couple of months later Producers Cubby Broccoli and Harry Saltzman hired Composer Monty Norman to write the music for their upcoming James Bond film Dr. No of which they had just won the rights to.

Whist filming in Jamaica Monty Norman met the legendary Count Basie. From Monty Norman's website, he tells the story of the very first James bond Theme.

While in Jamaica I met the great Count Basie who was doing a concert there. He asked me to send any numbers from Dr. No that might be possible for his orchestra.' Basie subsequently recorded four numbers: Dr No's Fantasy, The Kingston Calypso, Underneath The Mango Tree and The James Bond Theme...

...Dr. No's Fantasy, the version of the Bond theme which Basie recorded, was an earlier incarnation. 'Cubby, Harry and I wanted a distinctive main theme tune to help promote the film. I’d had one idea – Count Basie actually recorded it so it wasn’t that bad, but it wasn’t right, we didn’t feel it had the character of James Bond enough, the sinister-ness. While I was still working on it, a number I'd written some time before called Good Sign, Bad Sign came to mind.”
               - Excerpt from Monty Norman's website Bond, James Bond

    Video: Count Basie & his Orchestra - Dr. No's Fantasy               

So there you have it the first (of many) and originally rejected James bond theme. Count Basie's music has been used in 100s of films and adverts. The above Basie Bond music as well as other Count Basie renditions of other Bond music can be found on Count Basie and his Orchestra album release of Count Basie Meets Bond.

Year: 1962
Film: Dr. No
Actual Theme: James Bond Theme and Kingston Calypso by Monty Norman, John Barry & Orchestra
Submitted theme: Dr. No's Fantasy by Count Basie and his orchestra written by Monty Norman
Availability status: Count Basie's Dr. No's Fantasy (First Version) can be heard as a single
or from the 1966 Basie Meets Bond album from Count Basie and his Orchestra.




002.
1962 - Norman Monty's James Bond Theme


To discuss this song we have to go back a year to 1961 to Norman Monty's obscure melody Good Sign, Bad Sign (mentioned above) and the significant part it played in Bond history. This is possibly the most intriguing origin tale albeit shrouded in controversy that I discuss.

Around 1961, predating Count Basie's Dr. No's Fantasy Bond theme Norman Monty wrote a song called Good Sign, Bad Sign for a musical adaptation of a book called A House for Mr. Biswas by V.S. Naipaul. Here is Monty singing Good, Sign, Bad Sign. Listen to the opening chords.

    Video: Good Sign, Bad Sign by Monty Norman                

The play never made it to the stage but the song Good Sign, Bad Sign was transformed into possibly the most iconic film arrangement ever committed to tape/film - The James Bond Theme. In the clip below, from Channel 4's James Bond's Greatest Hits Composer Monty Norman John barry and guitarist Vic Flick amongst others discuss the evolution of Good Sign, Bad Sign into the song we now know as The James Bond Theme.

    Video: See Monty Norman discuss the astounding origin of The James Bond Theme on Channel 4's James Bond's Greatest Hits                

The clip also goes on to discuss the 2001 court action between Monty Norman and longtime Bond Composer John Barry for the ownership rights to The James Bond Theme. Even to this day, the tiff over who deserves credit for The James Bond Theme divides fans. Monty Norman discusses more of the Bond themes background over on his - website. The James Bond Theme peaked at No. 13 in the UK Singles Chart and was in the charts for 13 weeks.

Monty Norman continued on his notable career singing and composing for stage & film but as yet has not surpassed the fame of his Bond Theme. John Barry continued a successful 25 year run with Bond composing 11 Scores as well as many, many soundtracks.

 
Good Sign, Bad Sign lyrics by Monty Norman

I was born with this unlucky sneeze
And what is worse I came into the world the wrong way round
Pundits all agree I am the reason why
My father fell into the village pond and drowned...
 

Year: 1961 (Many determine the composition date to be in the 50s, but I presume 1961 as Dr. No was released in 1962 and V. S. Naipaul novel A House for Mr Biswas was published in 1961)
Film: All of them
Actual Theme: James Bond Theme by Monty Norman
Legitimacy status: Confirmed by Her Majesties Royal Courts
Availability status: Available on Monty Norman's 2005 album release Completing The Circle





003.
1964 - Anthony Newley's Goldfinger


Anthony Newley seems to be a genuinely interesting old school character. Starting as an actor he went on to have a long career as an actor on both the screen and stage, had a successful musical career, was an award-winning screenwriting, produced and directed.

Newley worked on 11 Warwick Films production, the partnership set up by Irving Allen and Cubby Broccoli.

In fact, my interest in him was initially piqued when I noticed his name in the credits as an actor on Tank Force! (1958) one of the many films Cubby Broccoli produced pre Bond.

Tank Force! is perhaps notable as it was originally named after the book it was based on Ronald Kemp's No Time to Die With Goldfinger the third Bond film, John Barry was given oversight of the music of Bond and composed the entire score and co-wrote the Goldfinger theme with Composer Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley. Apparently and thankfully Brocolli and Saltzman brought in Dame Shirley Bassey for the vocal duties at a later stage this signalled a shift as Goldfinger was the first Bond film with a female vocalist performing the theme song.

Dame Shirley Bassey's Goldfinger is instantly recognisable and is as synonymous with Bond as much as any part of the 007 legacy. But this almost never happened as Producer Harry Saltzman was opposed to the song and only time limitations of a new recording made it possible.

An earlier demo recording of Goldfinger surfaced with the theme sung by writer Anthony Newley. Newley's version is worth a listen to hear the direction they were intending and the final result.

As a footnote, famed composer Leslie Bricusse collaborated with John Barry again on the fifth Bond film Lewis Gilbert's 1967 You Only Live Twice writing lyrics for Nancy Sinatra's theme song. Bricusse also wrote lyrics for Bond 6, Peter R. Hunt's 1969 On Her Majesty's Secret Service. However in the end John Barry decided an instrumental-only song would be best.

    Video: 'Goldfinger': Anthony Newley - The Best of Bond...James Bond OST 1992                

 
Goldfinger by Anthony Newley

He's the man, the man with the Midas touch
A spider's touch
Such a cold finger
Beckons you to enter his web of sin
But don't go in

Golden words he will pour in your ear
But his lies can't disguise what you fear
For a golden girl knows when he's kissed her
It's the kiss of death ...

From Mister Goldfinger
Pretty girl, beware of his heart of gold
This heart is cold

Golden words he will pour in your ear
But his lies can't disguise what you fear
For a golden girl knows when he's kissed her
It's the kiss of death ...

From Mister Goldfinger
Pretty girl, beware of his heart of gold
This heart is cold
He loves only gold
Only gold
He loves gold
He loves only gold
Only gold
He loves gold
 


Year: 1964
Film: Goldfinger
Actual Theme: Goldfinger performed by Dame Shirley Bassey written by Leslie Bricusse, Anthony Newley & John Barry
Availability: Available on The Best Of James Bond: 30th Anniversary Collection Soundtrack





004.
1965 - Johnny Cash's Thunderball


Many may have heard Johnny Cash's version of Thunderball as it is a fairly unique take on a Bond song. A year after Goldfinger, Thunderball was rolled out. Again Dame Shirley Bassey recorded the theme song. Nattily called Mr. Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang (a title given to James Bond by either Japanese or Italian journalists) written by John Barry and Leslie Bricusse.

However shortly after Mr. Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang was re-recorded with Dionne Warwick performing the lead vocals.

Rumour has it that the Producers were worried that a theme without the film title included would not work. With little time till release John Barry teamed up with Don Black to write Thunderball in typical Bond record time and it was performed by Sir Tom Jones

Strains of the aforementioned Mr. Kiss Kiss Bang Bang can be heard throughout the film. At some point throughout the saga The Man in Black Johnny Cash apparently a Bond fan put forward a very Johnny Cash version of Thunderball for consideration.

Bear in mind that by this stage James Bond was a global phenomenon and everyone wanted to be part of the magic - but there as yet is virtually no information as to how or why Johnny Cash's version of Thunderball came into existence.

    Video: Johnny Cash performs Thunderball                


I like Johnny Cash and the energy of his song, his lyrics kind of capture the story of Thunderball but his version of Thunderball feels more suited to a Western film of the time than international spy intrigue and large underwater battles.

 
Thunderball lyrics performed by Mr. Johnny Cash

There is a rumble in the sky and all the world can hear it call
They shutter at the fury of the mighty Thunderball
The power of her engines, now, has drowned in the sea
But the deadly force from within her is somewhere running free

Thunderball, your fiery breath can burn the coldest man
And who is going to suffer from the power in your hand

Somewhere, there is a man who could stop the thing in time
He is known by very few but he’s feared by all in crime
By courage and by fighting, he has not been known to fall
But neither has the fury of the mighty Thunderball

Thunderball, your fiery breath can burn the coldest man
And who is going to suffer from the power in your hand

Money hungry minds need a thread to launch a scheme
But those, who hold the Thunderball, could rule the world, it seem(s)
Cannot the peaceful world find the clue to where she’s gone
The silent sea won’t answer now but terror lingers on

Thunderball, your fiery breath can burn the coldest man
And who is going to suffer from the power in your hand
 


Year: 1965
Film: Thunderball
Actual Theme: Thunderball performed by Tom Jones written by Don Black & John Barry
Availability: Johnny Cash's version of Thunderball can be heard as a single or found on his 2011 album release of Bootleg, Volume 2: From Memphis to Hollywood






005.
1967 - The Beach Boys' Run James Run for You Only live Twice


Again, this is another extraordinary entry into the Bond musical annals. It used to be that the surprising thing about You Only Live Twice was that film's screenplay was written by popular childrens author Roald Dahl.

That is until it was revealed that Brian Wilson had a long time hankering to do the music for a James Bond film. As with Johnny Cash's Thunderball there is very little information about Brian Wilson's interest in writing a James Bond theme.

After stepping off the stage as a performing Beach Boy and taking on the responsibility as the Producer of The Beach Boys Brian Wilson created some of his most personal and brilliant work.

In 1966 The Beach Boys' eleventh studio album Pet Sounds was released and after an initially lukewarm reception it went on to win over fans, a new audience and critics alike. Despite its lack of Beach, sound for many has become the definitive sound of The Beach Boys, one of the most influential albums of the time as well as is regularly featured on The Greatest Albums of all times lists.

There had been a long time running transatlantic rivalry between The Beach Boys and The Beatles, with many fans at the time wondering which would be the first to do a Bond theme.

Track 12 of Pet Sounds is eponymously entitled Pet Sounds. But its working title was Run James RunBrian Wilson had created it intending to submit it for use in a James Bond film. The next Bond film to be released at the time was - the fifth in the series Lewis Gilbert's You Only Live Twice so the assumption is that Wilson was aiming for You Only Live Twice.

In the clip below Brian Wilson talks a little about Run James Run confirming the story.

    Video: Brian Wilson – Playback: The Brian Wilson Anthology (‘Run James Run’ webisode)            


As you can hear in the interview with Billboard Magazine, Wilson explains how he took the title Run James Run and used it for an uncompleted car song available for the first time on his new album: Playback: The Brian Wilson Anthology. For your listening pleasure - in the clip below, some talented individual has laid Run James Run/ Pet Sounds over the titles for  You Only Live Twice.

    Video: You Only Live Twice Opening w/ music by the Beach Boys                


The following clip features a great Bond montage set to Pet Sounds.

    Video: The Beach Boys Pet Sounds - James Bond Montage                


This is astounding, as that would make one of The Beach Boys' most notable, influential and celebrated songs a James Bond-inspired tune.

Ultimately the theme for You Only Live Twice composed by John Barry was sung by Nancy Sinatra.

In a strange quirk of fate even though The Beatles were reportedly enamoured by Pet Sounds in the end they beat (well some of them) The Beach Boys to scoring a Bond soundtrack, when 7 years later in 1973 Paul McCartney & Wings did the theme and soundtrack for the 8th Bond film Guy Hamilton's Live and Let Die. Paul McCartney and Wings Live and Let Die went on to become the highest-selling Bond theme till then.

    Video: James Bond talks about ettiquette and The Beatles in Goldfinger                


 
                                BOND
                My dear girl, there are some things
                that just aren't done...

PAN on him as he walks into the kitchen putting on the bathrobe. A bamboo screen separates the kitchen from the bedroom.                                 BOND
                ... such as drinking Dom Perignon
                'fifty-three above a temperature of
                thirty-eight degrees Fahrenheit.
                That's as bad as listening to the
                Beatles without ear-muffs.
 


Recently there was some excitement around the possibility of the full vocal version of Run James Run being heard as it was meant - when it was announced that it would feature on Brian Wilson's upcoming album No Pier Pressure with vocals by Al Jardine. Sadly it has been confirmed that only the titles are the same.

Year: 1967
Film: Inconclusive but presumed to be You Only Live Twice based on timings
Actual Theme: You Only Live Twice performed by Nancy Sinatra written by Leslie Bricusse & John Barry
Availability: Pet Sounds / Run James Run can be heard as a single or found on The Beach Boys' Pet Sounds album and almost every Beach Boys Greatest Hits compilation.





006.
1973 - Alice Cooper's theme for The Man With The Golden Gun


Another fairly well publicised rejected Bond theme was American shock rocker Alice Cooper's contribution the Bond history with his rock theme for Guy Hamilton's The Man With The Golden Gun.

    Video: The Man With the Golden Gun w/ Alice Cooper                


According to Alice Cooper, the Bond producers rejected his theme at the last minute in favour of John Barry & Don Black's version of The Man with the Golden Gun performed by Lulu. He still maintains that his was better and would have brought muscle and power to the film. All in all, the instrumental part of the theme is pretty good but I feel Coopers' vocals let the song down. It feels a bit too much like a demo version of a song rather than the finished product.

 
I was reading the James Bond novels even before the first film came out.  Everyone in the band loved Bond novels and especially the John Barry soundtrack music. I had found out that the next Bond was going to be called "Man With The Golden Gun." I figured, 'Perfect, I'll beat them to the punch and use that title for our own song, figuring that they would want to use it.' When it came time for them to do the soundtrack, they used a song by Lulu. Lulu?!?

 - Excerpt from The Alice Cooper Life & Crimes CD Box Set
 


Not even the involvement of the Pointer Sisters, Ronnie Spector and Liza Minnelli could save Alice Cooper's lacklustre The Man with the Golden Gun.

It was supposed to be the Bond theme, but it actually came in a day too late, and by the time they heard it, they’d already signed for Lulu's song. I went, "You're gonna take Lulu over this?" [Laughs.] 'Cause it was perfect for The Man With The Golden Gun. It had helicopters, it had machine guns—it had the Pointer Sisters, Ronnie Spector, and Liza Minnelli doing background vocals! We went to every single one of those John Barry albums to try and invent the perfect James Bond song, and even Christopher Lee, who played Scaramanga in the movie, said, "Oh, man, why did we take the Lulu song? This song is the one!" [Laughs.] So, yeah, we lost out on that one, but I still put it on the album. I said, "I don't care, I’m going to do a James Bond track no matter what.

- Excerpt from an interview with Will Harris for The A.V Club The Alice Cooper Set list


 
Man With The Golden Gun lyrics by Alice Cooper, Glen Buxton, Michael Bruce, Neal Smith, Dennis Dunaway

The man With the golden gun
Is waiting Somewhere Out there For you

But you'll never see him He'll be looking for you

Demand For the golden gun
It's high priced Precise And true

But you'll never see him He'll be looking for you

The man with the golden Gun in his pocket, Oh, oh
The man with the golden Gun in his case, Oh, oh
The man with the golden Gun in your face

But you'll never see him He'll be looking for you
You better believe He'll be looking for you

He-e-e-e-e-e's,
The man with the golden Gun in his pocket
The man with the golden Gun in his case
The man with the golden Gun in his pocket
The man with the golden Gun in your face

But you'll never see him He'll be looking for you
You better believe He'll be looking for yo-ou

He-e-e-e-e-e's,
The man with the golden Gun in his pocket
The man with the golden Gun in his case
The man with the golden Gun in his pocket
The man with the golden Gun in your face

The man with the go-o-olden Gun in his pocket
The man with the go-o-lden Gun in his case
The man who gave you the golden gun
 


Year: 1974
Film: The Man with the Golden Gun
Actual Theme: The Man with the Golden Gun performed by Lulu written by Don Black & John Barry
Availability: Alice Cooper's Man With The Golden Gun can be heard as a single or found on Alice Cooper's 2007 album Muscle Of Love.





007.
1981 - Blondie's For Your Eyes Only James Bond Theme


Blondie or Deborah Harry's For Your Eyes Only James Bond Theme is notable for two reasons. The first being that it is pretty damn good, even by today's standards and with a little work could have been a great Bond theme whilst still sounding uniquely Blondie. Secondarily the reasons as to how the song ended up not being used - which makes me love Blondie even more as she stayed true to everything that we know about her.

    Video: For Your Eyes Only Opening w/ Blondie                


The story goes that the Bond producers approached Blondie to work on the theme for John Glen's For Your Eyes Only but at some point it was decided or revealed that Deborah Harry was not going to sing an original Blondie created song or even with Blondie, she would be singing a theme written by Bill Conti.

The composer behind scores like Rocky and the brilliant The Right Stuff, Conti came on board whilst Bond regular John Barry was unavailable. UltimatelyBlondie decided to pass on the opportunity. Top marks for Deborah Harry standing by her band.

Sheena Easton was approached and performed the theme for For Your Eyes Only written by Bill Conti and Michael Leeson. And she did it wonderfully.

 
For Your Eyes Only Theme by Blondie

Don't look over my shoulder
I'm trying to read
Remember these intimate moments
Don't forget my privacy
We both have our orders
And a trick up the sleeve
There's no use pretending
You're asleep

The subject was roses
Quine geology
Deliberate notice
You're taking of me

Caution and danger Are not family
Don't try turning the tables On me!

Too long and too lonely
For your eyes only
Secretly

Enjoy the paradox
You thinking I'm the fox
Can't ya see
You personally

So many people know who you are
And they know how you've been looking
For your counterpart

We're chasing an echo
In sonic 3D
And if I laugh without joking
Make believe

Too long and too lonely
For your eyes only
Secretly

Enjoy the paradox
You thinking I'm the fox
Can't ya see
You personally

Too long and too lonely
For your eyes only
Totally
You personally

I like what you're showing
For your eyes only
Secretly
For your eyes only
 


Year: 1981
Film: For Your Eyes Only
Actual Theme: For Your Eyes Only performed by Sheena Easton written by Bill Conti & Michael Leeson
Availability: You can hear Blondie's For Your Eyes Only as a single or off their 1982 album The Hunter





008.
1987 - The Pet Shop Boys James Bond theme for The Living Daylights


John Glen's 1987 The Living Daylights ushered in some changes to Bond, such as Timothy Dalton as a no*nonsense Bond and an adjustment to the musical format. The Living Daylights was the first Bond film to have both an opening song, The Living Daylights by a-ha, as well as a closing song If There Was a Man by Chrissie Hynde and The Pretenders composed with John Barry.

This dual song format continued off and on seemingly when the lead composer and the producers choice of song differed.

Ok! This one we are unsure of, details are sketchy at best and there is a lot of misinformation around the supposed Pet Shop Boys James Bond theme effort.

    Video: Pet Shop Boys - This must be the place I waited years to leave - Behaviour - Track 02                


The most credible source I have found are references made by Neil Tennant and Chris Lowe in the liner notes for This Must Be The Place I Waited Years To Leave on the Pet Shop Boys' 2008 re-issue of Behaviour:

Neil: It was originally written in the studio in Wandsworth in 1986. At the time it had been intimated to us that we might be asked to write the theme song for the James Bond film, The Living Daylights, so as a musical exercise we decided to write something that sounded, in our opinion, like a James Bond theme.

That's why you have the guitar at the start, which is a Stratocaster sample I'm playing. It has my trademark pitch-bend at the end. I love twang. I've always liked twang. Since I was a child and we used to go to the Royalty cinema in Gosforth for children's matinees and they used to play 'Wonderful Land' by the The Shadows, a track that can still bring tears to my eyes, I've always loved twang guitar. We never heard anything from the James Bond people - A-ha did the theme in the end."

I have read unsubstantiated stories claiming that the Pet Shop Boys demo was rejected, as well as some saying that the band had dropped out after creative differences. These differences stemming from, their expected involvement being the composing of the entire score whilst the producer's expected that they would create a theme song and elements of it that would be echoed throughout the score.

In a quirk or a foretelling, the Pet Shop Boys and Johnny Marr had struck up a friendship that led to them collaborating on numerous occasions, including Johnny Marr playing the guitar and being responsible for the guitar work, that Neil references in the liner notes on later recordings of This must be the place I waited years to leave.

Johnny Marr and Hans Zimmer have been collaborating on projects for over a decade including work on Christopher Nolan's Inception (2010), The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (2014) and Hans Zimmer's score for No Time To Die (2020).

 
This Must Be the Place I Waited Years to Leave by Neil Tennant & Chris Lowe

Each morning after Sunblest
Feel the benefit, mental arithmetic
I waited by the staff room
In time for benediction
Living a law just short of delusion
When we fall in love there's confusion
This must be the place I waited years to leave

To our voices nobody's listening
We shiver in the rain by the touchline
Then a coach ride to the station
"My lord, the carriage awaiteth!"
Living a law just short of delusion
When we fall in love there's confusion
This must be the place I waited years to leave
This must be the place I waited years to leave
And how
How long?

I'm listening to the words I thought I'd never hear again
A litany of saints and other ordinary men
Kneeling on the parquet
Whatever has gone wrong?
The fear and feeling hopelessness
I don't want to belong

I dreamt I was back in uniform
And a candidate for examination
History, someone had blundered
And a voice rapped "knuckle under!"
Living a law just short of delusion
When we fall in love there's confusion
This must be the place I waited years to leave
This must be the place I waited years to leave
And how
And how
How long?
 


Year: 1987
Film: The Living Daylights
Actual Theme: The Living Daylights performed by a-ha written by John Barry & Pål Waaktaar
Availability: The Pet Shop Boys' This Must Be The Place I Waited Years To Leave
 can be heard as a single or on their 1990 album release of Behaviour.






OO9.
1989 - Eric Clapton and Annie Lennox's License Revoked


For John Glen's 1989 Licence to Kill (originally entitled License Revoked) and Timothy Dalton's second and final turn as Bond. Eric Clapton threw his hat into the ring for Bond glory. Due to poor health John Barry sat this one out and composer Michael Kamen came on board. He brought Eric Clapton along as they had just collaborated on the score for Lethal Weapon and went on to work on numerous other soundtracks. He also brought on board, the original Bond guitarist - Vic Flick.

The legend goes that they were pretty far along in the process even making a promo video featuring the theme - but it was not to be. Sadly the song has been lost to time and never heard outside of the small original circle of creators and producers.

The Eurythmics were invited to collaborate on the soundtrack, whether this means that Annie Lennox was originally considered for the vocals of the Kamen / Clapton theme is unclear but at some point, there was talk of The Eurythmics doing an end credits song. However, legend has it that Annie Lennox was not that keen on the violence of Bond's world and opted out.

This led to Gladys Knight's Licence to Kill theme and Patti LaBelle's If You Asked Me To end credits song.

21 Years later in 2010 Dave Stewart of the Eurythmics would collaborate with Joss Stone for the theme song for James Bond 007: Blood Stone console game.

A slight update via mi6-hq.com - A month ago an Eric Clapton fan account on Soundcloud uploaded a track entitled James Bond Theme - Eric Clapton outtake. It was apparently procured "many years ago by an employee from the now closed Townhouse".

I am highly dubious of its provenance. To my untrained ear it sounds like a mix of various orchestral Bond melodies from different time periods, not all of them performed by official/authentic sources either, topping and tailing some Slowhand mixed in. I am not enough of an Eric Clapton fan to identify the tracks used or even if they are covers of Clapton's style and none of the track identification sites are flagging it.

There are also a couple of really noticeable traces of editing in the right channel where the James Bond bit meets the "Eric Clapton" bit. I wouldn't be surprised if this was unused Clapton bits from Edge of Darkness or Lethal Weapon.

Kudos though as whoever did this seems to know enough to add tin pan like sounds reminiscent of the Eurythmics 1983 Here Comes The Rain Again. This is either very clever or a complete coincidence.

If this audio did originate from the recording session that took place on the 7th of February 1989 at Townhouse Studios it is more likely to be a draft of how Clapton's style could work with existing Bond sound tropes.





Year: 1989
Film: Licence to Kill
Actual Theme: Licence to Kill by Gladys Knight
Availability status: Not Available



010. 011. and 012.
1995 - Bono's GoldenEye theme for GoldenEye


This one is very much in the vein of Anthony Newley's Goldfinger Demo. After a six-year hiatus, the longest to date. Bond made a welcome return to the screen in his 17th outing with Martin Campbell's GoldenEye.

Finally, after many false starts, GoldenEye introduced the world to Pierce Brosnan's James Bond and I feel his best Bond outing, with a pre-credit sequence almost rivalling Roger Moore's ski run in The Spy Who Loved Me. For the introduction of a new Bond, a bold and big theme song was needed. Rumour has it The Rolling Stones were originally approached but that sadly never panned out.

Enter U2's Bono who apparently after staying at Ian Fleming's Jamaican home Goldeneye and having just completed Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me, Kill Me for Batman Forever was keen to be involved in a Bond production. Along with the Edge, they wrote GoldenEye for his neighbour in France Tina Turner.

Ms Turner had some thoughts on Bono's Goldeneye demo.

... talk about that song - Bono sent me the worst demo. I was sitting at my home in Zurich and here was this... I think he was hoarse... He kind of threw it together as if he thought I wasn’t going to do it.

I called Roger [Davies, her manager) and said, this song, I don't even know what key to practise it in. It's unbelievable what I've been sent here. But again you have to step into the shoes and learn it.

Then I sang it as I would sing it and even Bono was impressed.

He said I should have known. I remember sending you that, after I sent it I realised it was really bad.

I had to come out of myself to make it a song. Afterwards, I liked what it transformed my kind of singing into. I had never sung a song like that, so it really gave my creativity in terms of making something out of something that was really rough."

- Excerpt from an interview with Graham Norton on BBC Radio 2 Sounds about the new West End Musical: Tina - The Tina Turner Musical, 21 April 2018


The demo version of Bono's vocals leaked. Again, it is interesting to hear what they were aiming for and Tina Turner's final cut. Well that, and, well that is Bono singing a Bond song - GoldenEye.

    Video: Bono's James Bond theme for GoldenEye (Demo)                


Bono and The Edge's GoldenEye helped relaunched Tina Turner's career and gave her a UK Top 10 hit. A year later Larry Mullen Jr. & Adam Clayton continued the U2 cinematic streak by updating Lalo Schifrin's theme for Tom Cruise's Mission: Impossible.

Skip forward 15 years, in 2010 Nicole Scherzinger teamed up with David Arnold & Kevin Kiner to perform her updated version of GoldenEye for the GoldenEye 007 console game and does an admirable job.

    Video: GoldenEye 007 Wii - intro featuring Nicole Scherzinger                


But the GoldenEye story doesn't end there, as there is a further bizarre twist in the tale bringing us to:

012.
Ace of Base's James Bond theme for GoldenEye


In fact, this twist is so bizarre I can't quite believe it, or find any verifiable sources. The story goes that the Swedish band Ace of Base were approached to perform the Bond theme for GoldenEye. The band were very popular at the time and - the band's American management decided it was too risky for Ace of Base to get involved with a Bond film.

As of now all that exists of Ace of Base's possible Bond involvement are the following songs that have subsequently surfaced. Surely a band would make sure they are keen to be involved with a project before committing time and effort to a creative endeavour like producing a demo of a song?

Herewith ia the demo version of Ace of Base's GoldenEye theme:

    Video:Rejected Goldeneye Theme - "The Goldeneye" by Ace of Base (Demo Version)                


And the later more punchy version with "The GoldenEye" lyrics replaced with "The Juvenile".:

    Video: Ace of Base - The Juvenile                


 
The Juvenile by Ace of Base


The juvenile
In a time where the night is so cold
The juvenile
Has the key to the end
The juvenile in the end
That is why we are here
The road will take us to the end
Tomorrow's foe is now a friend

Why don't we do it
Like they used to do it all so long ago
They kept together till the bitter end (Old and young)
Today we don't care
Either but the youth or but the old
They cannot rise their voices yet
But later on they will do

The juvenile
In a time where the night is so cold
The juvenile
Has the key to the end (always believe in)
The juvenile in the end
That is why we are here

The road will take us to the end
Tomorrow's foe is now a friend
No education
We don't need no education
Telling us the right to choose
If we have no choice (No, no, no)
It's so explosive
Any day will burst into a fire
Oh, come down and guide us
Before it is too late


The juvenile
In a time where the night is so cold
The juvenile
Has the key to the end (always believe in)
The juvenile in the end
That is why we are here
The road will take us to the end
Tomorrow's foe is now a friend

Oooh, oooh

Always and always and always believe in
Always believe in...

The juvenile
In a time where the night is so cold
The juvenile
Has the key to the end (always believe in)
The juvenile in the end
That is why we are here
The road will take us to the end

Tomorrow's foe is now a friend
 


Year: 1995
Film: GoldenEye
Actual Theme: GoldenEye performed by Tina Turner written by Bono & The Edge
Availability: Ace of Base's The Juvenile can be heard on their 2002 album Da Capo.





013. 014. 015. and 0.16
1997 - Tomorrow Never Dies by Pulp, Tomorrow Never Dies by Saint Etienne, Marc Almond's Only The Moment for Tomorrow Never Dies and Duran Duran's Tomorrow Never Dies


Yes, an additional four rejected James Bond themes for Tomorrow Never Dies. Well, actually there are potentially a dozen other Tomorrow Never Dies themes from musicians like; Glen Ballard, Swan Lee, Dot Allison, The FixxThe Cardigans, Space and even Bond alumni Duran Duran and more according to author and Bond expert Jon Burlingame in his book The Music of James Bond.

Below Saint Etienne singer Sarah Cracknell discusses a little about how the multi-theme extravaganza...

    Video: See Sarah Cracknell discuss the Tomorrow Never Dies Theme pitch on Channel 4's James Bond's Greatest Hits                


I kind of like The Fixx's The Fatal Shore straight-up rock sound, foretelling the later direction Bond would take with Chris Cornell's You Know My Name for Casino Royale. But the quality past the novelty makes Pulp's Tomorrow Never Dies (becoming Tomorrow Never Lies later) and Saint Etienne's Tomorrow Never Dies are pretty good attempts at a Bond theme, Marc Almond's Only The Moment is just a great song.

Pulp's Tomorrow Never Dies Theme

    Video: Tomorrow Never Dies Opening with Pulp                


Saint Etienne's Tomorrow Never Dies Theme

    Video: Tomorrow Never Dies Opening with Saint Etienne Song                


Marc Almond's Only The Moment for Tomorrow Never Dies Theme

    Video: Marc Almond - Only the Moment (All the Time in The World Mix)                


Duran Duran's Tomorrow Never Dies Theme

Duran Duran performed the theme for John Glen's A View to a Kill, the fourteenth Bond film and goodbye from Sir Roger Moore. In no small part, this was due to James Bond fan John Taylor's boldness. A quite like Duran Duran's A View to a Kill it is still the only Bond theme song to have reached number one on the US Billboard Hot 100, but I absolutely love John Barry's orchestrated instrumental version - A View to a Kill (That Fatal Kiss) released as the B-Side of the A View to a Kill single.

In unverifiable information floating around the web, supposedly on the 6 November 1995, Duran Duran guitarist Warren Cuccurullo had said that Nick Rhodes and himself had written and recorded a demo for Martin Campbell's Goldeneye.

This was a period where Duran Duran members were pursuing interests outside of Duran Duran or solo projects, particularly John Taylor who was deeply unhappy.

Information attributed to Cuccurullo's renowned guitar tech Thomas Nordegg had confirmed that the song was put together during sessions in July/ August 1995.

Nick Rhodes was on the keyboard, Warren Cuccurullo on guitar, Steve Alexander played the drums and Duran Duran backing singer Tessa Niles was the lead vocal performer.

During July the band were in Nomis Studios, London working on material. During August they were in Metropolis Studios, London recording. During these recording sessions, John Taylor left Duran Duran.

Singer Tessa Niles has worked with many legendary rock performers including, in a quirk, Tina Turner on her 1996 Wildest Dreams album which included the release of Goldeneye. However her biography Backtrack: The Voice Behind Music's Greatest Stars makes no mention of a Duran Duran Goldeneye track.

On the 21 November Goldeneye Premiered in Leicester Square, London. Tina Turner, John Taylor, Bono and Simon Le Bon were all in attendance.

As I understand it Duran Duran attempted again to pitch a theme in 1997 for Bond 18 - Tomorrow Never Dies.

The same details outlined above, with minor changes, are attributed to this attempt. This time the band recorded the song during Summer 1997 presumably while they were working on Medazzaland. Nick Rhodes, Warren Cuccurullo and Simon Le Bon worked on the song.

In November 2014 Duran Duran Unleashed, an unofficial fan compilation of bootleg songs leaked a demo version of Duran Duran's Tomorrow Never Dies with vocals apparently by Simon Le Bon.

    Audio: Duran Duran - Tomorrow Never Dies (Demo)                


As we know their pitch did not go the distance, but Duran Duran's Tomorrow Never Dies became Last Day On Earth and was released on Duran Duran`s 2000 PopTrash.

In 2000 John Taylor, Roger, and Andy Taylor rejoined Duran Duran.

Rumour has it that the Bond Producers never attempted a music selection process of this size again.

Year: 1997
Film: Tomorrow Never Dies
Actual Theme: Tomorrow Never Dies performed by Sheryl Crow written by Sheryl Crow & Mitchell Froom
Availability: Pulp's Tomorrow Never Lies can be heard as a single or off their 2006 album This Is Hardcore, Saint Etienne's Tomorrow Never Dies theme can be heard on their 1999 album Built On Sand and Marc Almond's Only the moment was released as a single in 1989.





2006 - Channel 4 James Bond's Greatest Hits
On November 16, 2006, as part of the promotions for the release of Martin Campbell's Casino Royale to be released two days later, Channel 4 broadcast a great little TV show - entitled James Bond's Greatest Hits. I referenced the same show earlier in this post. The show counted down the most popular Bond songs chosen from the, then 22 Bond themes (including the non-canon Bond films), via a Mori Poll as well as delved into the fascinating stories behind the songs.

It is worth noting that the theme song from Casino Royale, You Know My Name by Chris Cornell and David Arnold was officially released on November 13, 3 days before the show was broadcast.

The poll revealed the nation's 25-44-year-olds favourite Bond songs were:

022. 1983 - Octopussy (All Time High): Rita Coolidge
021. 1967 - Casino Royale (The Look of Love): Dusty Springfield
020. 1979 - Moonraker: Shirley Bassey
019. 1983 - Never Say Never Again: Lani Hall
018. 1965 - Thunderball: Tom Jones
017. 1999 - The World Is Not Enough: Shirley Manson
016. 1987 - The Living Daylights: a-ha
015. 1989 - Licence to Kill: Gladys Night
014. 1974 - The Man with the Golden Gun: Lulu
013. 1997 - Tomorrow Never Dies: Sheryl Crow
012. 1969 - On Her Majesty's Secret Service (We Have All The Time In The World): Louis Armstrong
011. 1995 - Goldeneye: Tina Turner
010. 1985 - A View to a Kill: Duran Duran
*009. 2002 - Die Another Day: Madonna
008. 1962 - Dr No (James Bond Theme): Monty Norman
007. 1967 - You Only Live Twice: Nancy Sinatra
006. 1977 - The Spy Who Loved Me (Nobody Does It Better): Carly Simon
005. 1981 - For Your Eyes Only: Sheena Easton
004. 1963 - From Russia with Love: Matt Monro
003. 1973 - Live and Let Die: Paul McCartney and Wings
002. 1971 - Diamonds Are Forever: Shirley Bassey
001. 1964 - Goldfinger: Shirley Bassey


*Madonna's Die Another Day was 001 with those under the age of 24.



016.
2010 - Joss Stone & Dave Stewart's I'll Take It All theme for the James Bond 007: Blood Stone console game


Not a film theme but another official game theme you may have never heard - unless of course, you dabble in gameplay as it is only available in-game.

Back in 2010 the same year Nicole Scherzinger's GoldenEye was released Joss Stone seemed to be part of a movement with Bond games preparing Bond fans for a return to seductive big bold brassy and unequivocally female-powered Bond themes - when she worked with longtime friend and collaborator The Eurythmics' Dave Stewart on the unmistakably Bondian I'll Take It All the theme from James Bond 007: Blood Stone console game. In some respects, this must-have felt like closure for Dave Stewart as he finally got to be involved in a Bond theme after his possible involvement in 1989s Licence to Kill. Below is the title sequence from the game.

    Video: James Bond 007 Blood Stone | title sequence (2010) Joss Stone & Dave Stewart (Eurythmics)                


 
I'll Take It All - Joss Stone & Dave Stewart

I don't care if I live or if I die
I don't mind if I fall or if I fly

The mission is clear
Your destiny's here
Keep a conscious mind
Put your all on the line
The ice in my mind
The way I'm ready to take it all
I'll take it all

I don't care if I live or if I die
I don't mind if I fall or if I fly
I don't care if I live
Or if I die

The edge of my soul
Cuts through it all
Pay attention and you'll find
You can run, don't hide
I'll catch you if you crawl
So stand up tall
We're face to face
Now let's... play

I don't care if I live or if I die
I don't mind if I fall or if I fly
I don't care if I live, oh
Or if I die, oh
We'll I don't mind
Said I don't mind if I die

As long as I try
I don't mind
I'll take it all

Whatever plans you make
There's no escaping time
Be sure to make no mistakes
Let go of fate and be mine

I don't care if I live or if I die
I don't mind if I fall or if I fly
I don't care if I live
Or if I die, oh
I'll take it all
I'll take it all
 


The full version of I'll Take It All can be heard here: James Bond 007 - Blood Stone Theme Song

Not only did Joss Stone sing the theme but she voiced the character of Nicole Hunter, a Bond lady in the game.

    Video: 007 Blood Stone - Joss Stone Featurette - PS3 Xbox360                


Year: 2010
Game: James Bond 007: Blood Stone
Actual Theme: I'll Take It All performed by Joss Stone written by Joss Stone & Dave Stewart
Availability: Joss Stone & Dave Stewart's I'll Take It All theme can be heard in-game or if you are lucky - live, an official track has never been released





017.
2009 - Shirley Bassey's No Good About Goodbye


Dame Shirley Bassey has sung three Bond themes; Goldfinger, Diamonds Are Forever and Moonraker, several unused themes as well as various covers of Bond themes. As much as there have been magnificent talents that have brought their own style or reinvigorated the sound of Bond Shirley Bassey is the sound of Bond for me.

Don Black co-wrote three Bond songs; Thunderball, Diamonds Are Forever and The Man with the Golden Gun with John Barry and two with David Arnold; Tomorrow Never Dies and The World Is Not Enough.

David Arnold has scored five Bond films; Tomorrow Never Dies, The World Is Not Enough, Die Another Day, Casino Royale and Quantum of Solace as well as released the definitive Bond tribute album Shaken and Stirred: The David Arnold James Bond Project.

So it was a bit of surprise when; No Good About Goodbye a superb David Arnold, Don Black and Shirley Bassey was leaked onto the net as a rejected theme for Quantum of Solace. Well with both the words quantum and solace used in the song and the opening bears similarities to the Quantum of Solace soundtrack. So I can see why it is thought of as a potential Bond song

The popular story of the song is that the song was not finished in time and the Producers decided on the Jack White & Alicia Keys' Another Way to Die.

    Video: Quantum of Solace rejected Theme by Shirley Bassey/ David arnold                


A less popular story confirmed by David Arnold is that No Good About Goodbye was never intended as a Bond theme. It was a song intended for Shirley Bassey's upcoming album - The Performance.

The same album he lured Shirley Bassey out of semi-retirement for and co-produced. The Performance DameShirley Bassey's first new album in 20 years, went Gold.

 
No Good About Goodbyes - Shirley Bassey, David Arnold and Don Black

Where is the solace that I crave?
Will it still haunt me to my grave?
Too broken to forgive, too painful to relive now
There may be other arms to hold
They'll only keep me from the cold
There always be a space, a fact I have to face now

How long does a heart stay broken?
How long if the pain's unspoken?
No solace in a kiss
No comfort in the sigh
No good about goodbye
My heart is no good at pretending
It knows that the hurts never ending
No solace in a kiss
No comfort in the sigh
No good about goodbye

There's only so much you can give
Only through forgets to live
And easy thing to say
The pass will go away now
How long does a heart stay broken?
How long if the pain's unspoken?
No solace in a kiss
No comfort in the sigh
No good about goodbye
My heart is no good at pretending
It knows that the hurts never ending
No solace in a kiss
No comfort in the sigh
No good about goodbye

I'll never be yours so come to your senses
Before you make your move think of the consequences

How long does a heart stay broken?
How long if the pain's unspoken?
No solace in a kiss
No comfort in the sigh
No good about goodbye
My heart is no good at pretending
It knows that the hurts never ending
No solace in a kiss
No comfort in the sigh
No good about goodbye

No good about goodbye
No good about goodbye.
 


Year: 2008
Film: Quantum of Solace
Actual Theme: Another Way to Die, performed by Jack White & Alicia Keys
Submitted theme: No Good About Goodbye
performed by
Shirley Bassey written by David Arnold & Don Black
Availability status: Shirley Bassey's No Good About Goodbye can be heard in both Single format or from her 2009 album The Performance





2012 - YouGov Favourite Bond Theme Poll
In the run-up to the release of Sam Mendes' Skyfall in October 2012. YouGov released its results on 8 October of a poll conducted of 1745 British adults to find their favourite Bond theme.

It is worth noting that the theme song from Skyfall, eponymously named Skyfall by Adele and Paul Epworth with orchestration by J. A. C. Redford was released at 0:07 BST on 5 October 2012 as part of the Global James Bond Day, 3 days before the poll's results were announced.

022. 1965 - Thunderball: Tom Jones
021. 1974 - The Man with the Golden Gun: Lulu
020. 1979 - Moonraker: Shirley Bassey
019. 1997 - Tomorrow Never Dies: Sheryl Crow
018. 1999 - The World Is Not Enough: Shirley Manson
017. 2002 - Die Another Day: Madonna
016. 2008 - Quantum Of Solace (Another Way To Die): Jack White & Alicia Keys
015. 1967 - You Only Live Twice: Nancy Sinatra
014. 1983 - Octopussy (All Time High): Rita Coolidge
013. 1987 - The Living Daylights: a-ha
012. 2006 - Casino Royale (You Know My Name): Chris Cornell
011. 1995 - Goldeneye: Tina Turner
010. 1981 - For Your Eyes Only: Sheena Easton
009. 1985 - A View to a Kill: Duran Duran
008. James Bond Theme - John Barry?? 1962 - Dr No (James Bond Theme): Monty Norman
007. "Don't know"
006. 1964 - Goldfinger: Shirley Bassey
005. "None of these"
004. 1971 - Diamonds Are Forever: Shirley Bassey
003. 1969 - On Her Majesty's Secret Service (We Have All The Time In The World): Louis Armstrong
002. 1977 - The Spy Who Loved Me (Nobody Does It Better): Carly Simon
001. 1973 - Live and Let Die: Paul McCartney and Wings


018. & 019.
2015 - Radiohead's Spectre


Possibly the most famous none Bond theme in recent years is Radiohead's SPECTRE. Less well know is the fascinating backstory to how it came to be.

As told by SPECTRE director Sam Mendes in a BBC Radio 6 Music - Sound and Vision interview (November 2017) - back in 2014 or thereabouts Radiohead were in the running to do the theme song for SPECTRE. They submitted a previously unreleased mid 90s song befittingly entitled Man of War or as it was originally known by fans - Big Boots.

Back in 1995 Thom Yorke described Man of War as:

 
Man of War is very melodramatic. Too melodramatic. When we started out, it was just a homage to Bond themes really. I like it. It's pretty much the opposite to everything we're writing."

- Excerpt from TURN YOUR RADIOHEAD ON! NME interview with Thom Yorke, November 18, 1995
 


During the mid-90s Radiohead was to some degree or other keen on Bond themes, possibly spurred on by the upcoming production of Goldeneye, as during their 95 The Bends tour a cover of Carly Simon's 1977 Bond theme Nobody Does It Better worked its way onto their setlist along with Big Boots / Man of War.

    Video: Radiohead - Nobody Does It Better (Live MTV Most Wanted 1995)                


Apparently, Big Boots / Man of War was written around the time Radiohead were putting together their second album The Bends but couldn't get it to sound right, as with further attempts to record it.

Performed live during their 1995 The Bends tour but never released the song became known as Big Boots. Until it was being considered for a B-Side on the 22 January 1996 single release of Street Spirit (Fade Out) and became officially known as Man-of-War or Man of War.

Man of War reappeared again when Radiohead was contributing to the soundtrack for Jeremiah S. Chechik's 1998 big-screen adaptation of Brit TV classic The Avengers starring Uma Thurman, Ralph Fiennes and Sir Sean Connery as the antagonist Sir August de Wynter. Again they were not happy with the end result. This recording session can be seen in Grant Gee's award-winning 1998 Radiohead documentary Meeting People Is Easy made during Radiohead's OK Computer Tour period.



Back to 2015, Man of War was turned down by the Bond team as it was not an original song written specifically for SPECTRE, hence could not be considered for awards consideration.

Undeterred Radiohead paused work on their album A Moon Shaped Pool and created a new theme entitled Spectre. Sadly it was deemed to not be a fit for the film.

Sam Smith's Writing's on the Wall went on to win a Best Original Song Oscar. The Bond franchises second, after the previous film's theme Skyfall by Adele.

Radiohead released Spectre as a free digital download on Christmas Day, 2015.

    Video: Spectre (2015) Main Title with Radiohead Song & Credit                


 
Spectre - Philip Selway, Colin Greenwood, Jonny Greenwood, Ed O’Brien & Thom Yorke

I'm lost, I'm a ghost
Dispossessed, taken host
My hunger burns a bullet hole

A spectre of my mortal soul
These rumors and suspicion
Anger is a poison

The only truth that I could see
Is when you put your lips to me
Future's tricked by the past

Spectre, how he laughs
Fear puts a spell on us
Always second-guessing love
My hunger burns a bullet hole

A spectre of my mortal soul
The only truth that I can see

Spectre has come for me
 


Fans had to wait a further 2 years until Radiohead's 2017 reissue of OK Computer entitled OKNOTOK 1997 2017 to finally hear an official and high-quality recording of Man of War.

    Video: Radiohead - Man Of War                


 
Man of War - Philip Selway, Colin Greenwood, Jonny Greenwood, Ed O’Brien & Thom Yorke

Drift all you like
From ocean to ocean
Search the whole world
But drunken confessions
And hijacked affairs
Will just make you more alone

When you come home
I'll bake you a cake
Made of all their eyes
I wish you could see me
Dressed for the kill
You're my man of war
You're my man of war

And the worms will come for you Big boots
Yeah, yeah, yeah

So unplug the phones
Stop all the taps
It all comes flooding back
From poisoned cloud
And poisoned dwarf
You're my man of war
You're my man of war

And the worms will come for you
Big boots
Yeah, the worms will come for you
Big boots
For you
Big boots
 


Year: 2015
Film: SPECTRE
Actual Theme: Writing's on the Wall written by Sam Smith and Jimmy Napes
Availability: Radiohead's Spectre can be found as a bonus track on A Moon Shaped Pool or single track, Man of War can be found on the album OK COMPUTER OKNOTOK 1997 - 2017 or as a single.





For completeness' sake and context, I'll be listing the results from further surveys delving into the popularity of James Bond themes.

2015 - ITV's The Nation's Favourite Bond Song

On 17 December 2015 almost two months after the release of Sam Mendes' Spectre (26 October), ITV revealed the results from their nationwide survey of their viewers' favourite James Bond Theme from 24 films in a show aptly titled The Nation's Favourite Bond Song. It is worth noting that, in a slightly different timeframe, than previous polls, the results of the survey came in 3 months after Sam Smith and Jimmy Napes' theme song Writing's on the Wall (25 September 2015) was released. Some press outlets incorrectly reported Sam Smith's Writing's on the Wall as coming in at No.5 in the poll, although Writing's on the Wall was featured in the show just before No.4 Diamonds Are Forever by Shirley Bassey, it did not make the list of 20. Writing's on the Wall did go on to be the first Bond theme to reach number one in the UK Singles Chart.

The Nation's Favourite Bond Songs were:

020. 2008 - Quantum Of Solace (Another Way To Die): Jack White & Alicia Keys
019. 1997 - Tomorrow Never Dies: Sheryl Crow
018. 1999 - The World Is Not Enough: Shirley Manson
017. 2002 - Die Another Day: Madonna
016. 1974 - The Man with the Golden Gun: Lulu
015. 1965 - Thunderball: Tom Jones
014. 2006 - Casino Royale (You Know My Name): Chris Cornell
013. 1987 - The Living Daylights: a-ha
012. 1989 - Licence to Kill: Gladys Night
011. 1995 - Goldeneye: Tina Turner
010. 1967 - You Only Live Twice: Nancy Sinatra
009. 1963 - From Russia with Love: Matt Monro
008. 1981 - For Your Eyes Only: Sheena Easton
007. 1985 - A View to a Kill: Duran Duran
006. 1969 - On Her Majesty's Secret Service (We Have All The Time In The World): Louis Armstrong
005. 1977 - The Spy Who Loved Me (Nobody Does It Better): Carly Simon
004. 1971 - Diamonds Are Forever: Shirley Bassey
003. 1964 - Goldfinger: Shirley Bassey
002. 1973 - Live and Let Die: Paul McCartney and Wings
001. 2012 - Skyfall: Adele


This brings us to the most recent poll conducted.

2020 - Ginger Research "Greatest Bond Theme"

In February 2020 Ginger Research conducted and released the results of a poll of 2000 people to find their greatest James Bond Theme. It is worth noting that the gap in the timing of the release of the poll's results and the September 2021 release of Cary Joji Fukunaga's No Time to Die, was due to the Covid pandemics much publicised delay of the release of the film which was originaly scheduled for an April 2020 release. Billie Eilish and her brother Finneas O'Connell's theme No Time To Die was released online in October 2020 before being performed live for the first time in February 2021 and released the same month.

The results were as follows:

025. 1962 - Dr No (James Bond Theme): Monty Norman
024. 1983 - Octopussy (All Time High): Rita Coolidge
023. 1969 - On Her Majestys Secret Service (We Have All The Time In The World): Louis Armstrong
022. 1999 - The World Is Not Enough: Shirley Manson
021. 1967 - You Only Live Twice: Nancy Sinatra
020. 1979 - Moonraker: Shirley Bassey
019. 2008 - Quantum Of Solace (Another Way To Die): Jack White & Alicia Keys
018. 1997 - Tomorrow Never Dies: Sheryl Crow
017. 1965 - Thunderball: Tom Jones
016. 2020 - No Time To Die: Billie Eilish
015. 1989 - Licence to Kill: Gladys Night
014. 1974 - The Man with the Golden Gun: Lulu
013. 1963 - From Russia with Love: Matt Monro
012. 1987 - The Living Daylights: a-ha
011. 2002 - Die Another Day: Madonna
010. 2006 - Casino Royale (You Know My Name): Chris Cornell
009. 1981 - For Your Eyes Only: Sheena Easton
008. 1995 - GoldenEye: Tina Turner
007. 2015 - SPECTRE (Writing’s on the Wall): Sam Smith
006. 1977 - The Spy Who Loved Me (Nobody Does It Better): Carly Simon
005. 1985 - A View to a Kill: Duran Duran
004. 1964 - Goldfinger: Shirley Bassey
003. 1971 - Diamonds Are Forever: Shirley Bassey
002. 1973 - Live and Let Die: Paul McCartney and Wings
001. 2012 - Skyfall: Adele


    The Establishing Shot: SPECTRE FIRST TV SPOT 60 SEC. - 6 Nov 2015                


James Bond will be back in the 24th James Bond adventure, SPECTRE.Set for global release on November 6, 2015.

SPECTRE stars Daniel Craig as James Bond, returning cast, Ralph Fiennes as "M", Naomie Harris, Ben Whishaw and Rory Kinnear as well as introducing Christoph Waltz, Léa Seydoux, Dave Bautista, Monica Bellucci and Andrew Scott.

A cryptic message from Bond’s past sends him on a trail to uncover a sinister organisation. While M battles political forces to keep the secret service alive, Bond peels back the layers of deceit to reveal the terrible truth behind SPECTRE.

Written by John Logan and Neal Purvis & Robert Wade, Director of Photography is Hoyte van Hoytema and Editor is Lee Smith.  Production Designer, Dennis Gassner returns along with Costume Designer, Jany Temime and Composer, Thomas Newman.

James Bond is the longest running, and one of the most successful franchises of all time, with twenty-three films produced and the twenty-fourth about to go in to production.

Michael G. Wilson and Barbara Broccoli succeeded Albert R 'Cubby' Broccoli and have produced the past seven Bond films together, including the highly successful Casino Royale, Quantum of Solace and Skyfall.

For more information on SPECTRE head over to the official James Bond website http://www.007.com/
FaceBook page https://www.facebook.com/JamesBond007
or the official 007 Twitter feed https://twitter.com/007



THE ESTABLISHING SHOT: JAMES BOND THEMES YOU PROBABLY HAVEN'T HEARD INCLUDING THE REMARKABLE ORIGINAL VERSION OF MONTY NORMAN'S ICONIC JAMES BOND THEME

1 comment:

  1. Fascinating... I love the Blondie song and can't believe I'd never heard it before.

    However I'm not convinced Only the Moment by Marc Almond (wonderful as the proper version is) was the song submitted. Reason being, it predates the mid nineties production period of Tomorrow Never Dies by a good five years and released as a single already. He's said in the interview you've embedded here that indeed his track was rejected but doesn't actually say in that clip that Only the Moment was the song. Nor does Only the Moment end on a Bassey-esque high note as he describes in the clip. Admittedly Only the Moment does have a Bond titles-ish video which has led someone to make this assumption but this is probably coincidence. More likely the song submitted was one of the tracks that appeared on his Stranger Things album in 2001 - my personal speculation is that "Born to Cry" is more likely.

    In any case, with the songs they did choose for Tomorrow Never Dies, I think KD Lang, whose song was used for end titles was robbed of the main glory anyway as her song was way way better than Sheryl Crow's intro.

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